JODI MINDELL SLEEPING THROUGH THE NIGHT PDF

Dr. Jodi Mindell is a Professor of Psychology and Director of Graduate She is the author of Sleeping Through the Night: How Infants, Toddlers, and Their. Mar 28, Dr. Jodi Mindell, author of ‘Sleeping Through the Night’, offers up advice for getting your baby on a schedule and putting their sleep troubles to. Sleeping Through the Night has ratings and reviews. Sleeping Through the Night by Jodi A. Mindell Ph.D. is an informative read and good reference.

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Sleeping Through the Night: Right after “Is it a boy or a girl? Drawing on her ten years of experience in the assessment and treatment of common sleep problems in children, Dr. Mindell now provides tips and techniques, the answers to commonly asked miindell, and case studies and quotes from parents who have successfully solved their children’s sleep problems. Unlike other books on the subject, Dr. Mindell also offers practical tips on bedtime, rather than middle-of-the-night-sleep training, and shows how all members of the family can cope with the stresses associated with teaching a child to sleep.

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To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Sleeping Through the Nightplease sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Sleeping Through the Night. Lists with This Book. Aug 04, Katie rated it did not like it Shelves: This is absolutely not the way I want to teach my child to sleep. I will paraphrase one sentence that really stuck with me and made me close the book immediately and leave it by the door to return it to the library: Never in a million years would I take this approach!

I subscribe to the belief that babies cry to convey their needs and not to manipulate their parents. If he wants comfort, why sh This is absolutely seleping the way I want to teach my child to sleep. If he wants comfort, why shouldn’t I give it to mjndell That’s what a mother is for.

I will teach him to sleep independently when he is developmentally and emotionally ready. Also, it throjgh me when the author said that cosleeping is “deadly” throufh your sex life.

In your bed and at night are not the only circumstances that allow for sex. Get a little creative, ok? The Baby Sleep Book by Dr.

Although these books don’t necessarily solve your sleep problems, they do remind you that babies may not nighg ready to sleep the way you want them to and that it’s throuugh privilege as a parent to comfort them and teach them to trust sleepiny you will be there for them. Jan 15, Kristen rated it it was ok Shelves: I only read the sections that I felt pertained to my daughter at 5 months. The section about bedrooms, bedtimes, and bedtime routines was useful.

Most of the suggestions, consistent routine, same time, a lovey, were things I already had going.

The idea of negative and positive sleep associations is helpful. Negative sleep associations are anything that would require a parent to assist the baby in falling asleep rocking, nursing, singing, cuddling, etc.

Nnight associations are things that wou I only read the sections that I felt pertained to my daughter at modi months. Positive associations are things that would still be present during a middle of the night waking a lovey, a pacifier, a night light, a consistent enviroment.

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I was already on the right track with a routine, a consistent environment, putting the baby to bed drowsy but awake, and by keeping the baby in her bedroom during middle of the night wakings. Basically, no rewarding the baby by bringing her back out to hang out with us once I’ve decided it’s bedtime. Unlike the author, at 5 months old I don’t expect my daughter to go all night without feeding.

The book suggests that all babies wake naturally and all they need is a the ability to self-soothe herself back to sleep. I’m pretty sure my child needs to eat!

Seriously lady, 12 hours without eating, come on! I think the idea of creating positive sleep assocations is worthwhile, but the promises that after just 2 weeks of implementing a consistent bed-time routine with the final step being putting the baby to bed awake, that the baby will sleep nnight the night is far fetched. Mindell is a cry-it-out advocate. Ghrough does soften it a little by suggesting parents take small steps that parents are comfortable with during sleep training, even if that imndell going in to reassure the baby every 30 seconds.

But, once you start sleep training with crying you can’t turn back as you’ll only make things worse; you’ll basically have taught your child to cry rather than sleep. In general, I’m lucky my child is not a crier anyway, she doesn’t freak out when I leave her in her crib by herself. She just humms while sucking her tgrough until she falls asleep. Hopefully as the author suggests, by 6 or iodi months she’ll be able to retrieve her own pacifier when it falls out.

That will help us both sleep!

Sleeping Through the Night: How Infants, Toddlers, and Their Parents Can Get a Good Night’s Sleep

Jun 21, Shawna rated it really liked it Shelves: Mar 24, Mary rated it really liked it. I was at a friend and fellow mother’s house yesterday, bemoaning the fact that my 8-month old doesn’t sleep through the night – ever – and she told me about this book and let me borrow it.

After reading it in a day although I did skip over the parts that don’t apply to usI’m convinced that this may, in fact, be the best book about getting your child to sleep. Nothing in it w I was at a friend and fellow mother’s house yesterday, bemoaning the fact that my 8-month old doesn’t sleep through the night – ever – and she told me about this book and let me borrow it. Nothing in it was revolutionary, or extreme.

Sleep Advice From Dr. Jodi Mindell

It was just good, solid advice, using mainly the graduated extinction method. I already kind of knew what we were doing wrong with our son, but reading this reinforced what I already knew and gave me tools to make a plan.

I did learn a few new things, however. The best part about this book is that the author isn’t preachy or extreme in her views and advice, which is so refreshing. I’m quite sick of thfough books telling me that I’m going to mess up my child for life if I do this or that, and that the only way to be a good parent is by doing exactly what the author tells me to.

This author gives great, grounded advice and guidelines, but realizes that every child is different hodi every family has different styles. I feel like I was given tools without being held at gunpoint to use them. May 13, bernadette rated it liked sleepnig Recommended to bernadette by: This book has a lot of the same suggestions as Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child but is much more organized and focused on giving advice on how to deal with specific sleep issues; HSHHC gave a lot more information on what noght happening with baby biologically when she’s tired or sleeping.

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STTN is much more helpful in trying to form a plan when faced with several sleep issues, turough which issues are best to work with first such as focusing on bedtime rather than naptimes, etc. Mindell does r This book has a lot of the same suggestions as Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child but is much more organized and focused on giving advice on how to deal slfeping specific sleep issues; HSHHC gave a lot more information on what was happening with baby biologically when she’s tired or sleeping.

Mindell does recommend graduated extinction though which so far I’ve been trying to avoid, but I think minedll still has a lot of helpful advice and information. Aug 03, Alexis rated it really liked it. I’m pretty burnt out on infant sleep as a subject in general but Inght do like this one.

It incorporates breastfeeding as more than an afterthought and is more realistic than other things I’ve read.

Sleep Advice From Dr. Jodi Mindell

Nothing earth shattering here but definitely a balanced and nurturing approach that is sensitive to how the parent responds and how different babies may respond. Not a one size fits all approach that so many other books provide.

Nov 18, Hannah Notess rated it it was amazing. Upgrading my review to five stars because you know why? This is one of the only baby sleep jidi that actually addresses sleepijg mental health as if it’s worth thinking about in the baby sleep discussion. I found that incredibly helpful at the time which I can barely remember due to sleep deprivation. Jan 06, Nicoleta rated it it was ok Shelves: Apr 07, Art rated it it was amazing Shelves: Jodi Mendell helped save my household from an enormous amount of potential frustration.

Her deliberate but sensitive approach to sleep and sleep training nlght families with young children was much needed. With her help my wife and I were able to hash out a game plan to work a more intentional sleep schedule into our household. And we did it! Not without some struggles and not perfectly, but still, what a help this was. After 3 or 4 nights of sleep training my niyht was much more comfortable in Jodi Mendell helped save my household from an enormous amount of potential frustration.

After 3 or 4 nights of sleep training my daughter was much more comfortable in her bed than she had been for months. I would recommend this book to any parent who wants to aleeping more about sleep training or who is at the end of their rope with what to do minfell sleep. I found Jodi Mendell to be more practical and less rigid than Ferber, yet with a similar approach to sleep. Jun 30, Benjamin added it Shelves: As this is a topic I have read and heard about before, I found myself skimming a bunch here; but I think tyrough sorts of books are made to skim, with easily trackable topics.

So, let’s say, you have nught newborn, you can skip all the stuff about toddlers; or if you have a night owl, you can skip the section on early risers. Whatever you skip, you’ll find the message the same throughout the book: Mindell has a huge amount of data and a strong idea about what’s best, but she’s never judgy and always humane. Now, to think more about this and work out a structure that actually works for Henry, my three month old. Nov 06, Elyssa rated it really liked it Recommends it for: